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tremendous economic financial pressure on the entire global economy, including europe. >> in the same way in which the collapse of lehman implied global shocks, a dissolve in the situation of the eurozone is going to impact the united states. >> while everyone is telling the germans, "bail these guys out now," the germans are saying, "if we're gonna bail them out, we wanna fix the political crisis." >> at the end of the day, europe and the eurozone face an existential question: can we become the united states of europe? >> in a democracy, agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so interconnected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring americans to learn more about th
is a senior fellow at our global economy, and i will sit with him and asking a few questions. and then we will turn to questions over to you, the audience. we will have simultaneous translation. my mother, may she rest in piece, is a greek language teacher. she will be rolling in a great asset to my own good piece on. so without i give you alexis tsipras. [applause] >> please join your piece to number two for the translation. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: i want to express our opinions, our view on the cause of the crisis, and our vision for the necessary changes that have to take place in greece. so that we can change from becoming guinea pigs of the crisis to the country that will serve as the starting point for new, progressive changes that will lead the worldwide economy to safe harbors. and so it is a special honor for me to be here at brookings. this is a foundation with strong traditions and document conversation with facts. this is a foundation that and cn understand what's at stake, both in greece and in europe today. when i was young i remember those older than me t
as we near the 1500 mark on the s&p 500. and a 0.1% contraction is expected for the german economy in the fourth quarter. those figures will be out in just under 30 minutes. >>> the governors of the banks of italy -- trade in siena. and imf's christine legarde tells us that central bank stimulus is still needed. >> we have the central bank on the one hand which have done quite a lot, which have been the fireman, in a way. and you have the policymakers on the other hand particularly in the eurozone who have made some progress and need to keep the momentum. >> now, any minute now, we're expecting the results from germany's ifo institute. january business climate index survey is expected to rise to a reading of 103 from 102.4 in december. this, of course, follows an increase in expectations in the dew survey earlier this week. we've seen an increase in the pmi surveys for germany over the last couple of months. as the german economy particularly looking to climb out of its contraction in the fourth quarter, we're waiting on the ifo senior va to tell us whether sentiment broadly speaki
the economy back on track, in particular battling years of deflation here. you can imagine really on the defensive today refuting claims of currency manipulation made by germany's leader. this came after germany's chancellor said japan's easing monetary measures could devalue the yen. the finance minister denied the accusation. >> translator: japan is pursuing bold economic measures to pull the country out of deflation, not to manipulate the currency. >> the japanese currency is trading at its weakest level in two years and seven months. he said this is a sign that excessive strength of the yen is being corrected now. economic revitalization minister also said he in tends to seek more understanding regarding japan's financial policy at the annual meeting of the world economic forum. he's taking part in the meeting from saturday. >>> meanwhile the head of the bank of japan stressed the central bank will continue promoting seamless and powerful monetary easing. the governor gave an address in tokyo on friday pep said an inflation target and mormon tear easing to achieve it are neede
great economies, france and germany. they have been friends for 50 years. >> after centuries of conflict, they culminated in two world wars. speaking at a news conference in berlin, german chancellor angela merkel and french president francois hollande talking about that. >> they promised to unveil proposals in the coming months and it is a big step forward dr. became to power pledging to reverse the plans that merkel had championed. >> it is the first time these bundestag has had a full parliament from another country here. the french president, hollande, recalled the original spirit leading to the historic relationship. >> young people are not only our future but also the reason for the policies that we are pursuing. >> young people in both of our countries have the uncomfortable good fortune that they have never had to experience in it. but peace and democracy. >> he also addressed the economic crisis in europe and chancellor merkel followed suit. she stressed it is necessary. >> what have we learned from 50 years of franco-german friendship? our greatest problems can be solved when w
worldwide with the size of that economy including in japan, the united states, china. look at the trade figures worldwide. in 2010 trade grew coming out of the great recession 13.9%, and in 2011 it was 5%, and i think the final figures for last year, 2012, will be somewhere between 2.5 or 2.7. so it's no wonder that you have the problems that you do in major economies worldwide with the slowdown in trade. and i think that unfortunately, i think that we're going to see a continuation of the problems in europe at least for the most part of 2013, just take a look at the latest figures out of germany which was the strongest economy in the eurozone when it came out. and we have our own problems, as you're aware, here in the united states notwithstanding getting by the immediate crisis at the end of this year on the so-called fiscal cliff. all we managed to do was to put off some of the biggest decisions for another two or three months. so i think, you know, europe has managed along with a little help from ourselves and elsewhere has managed to cloud the world economy. in the case of japan, i
in the arab world, which have taken their toll on the country's tourism industry. the economy has come to a standstill. unemployment is high. life is tougher than ever for the poor. this teacher has a big family to support. two wives, seven children. he has been hard hit by hikes in fuel prices this winter. >> the government needs to take care of the middle class. across the world, it is the middle-class sees that support the government. as long as they are not impoverished. then he says that if the political system stays the same, nothing will change. he is part of an opposition movement which boycotted the elections. as far as he is concerned, the king can stay in office, but only as a figurehead. >> the movement is calling for a change in the regime, and if that does not happen, then the next step would be the overthrow of the regime. that means the king. >> jordan is looking for a smooth transition to more democracy without a civil war like syria or an islamist government as in egypt. what happens all depends on how willing the king is to bring about change. >> tensions are running
in 2012. i don't think you are going to get quite the'e got to get the money working in the economy. think about it: no one really thinks we can get back to all-time highs, even though we had a good year in most mutual funds, indexes and general stocks last year. so there is a lot of skepticism that we can get going. but you heard my targets right here. > i love that i heard them here. so it is all about the indices. but are there individual stocks that you would buy at this level? > > the past few years a lot of people have been focused on sort of special situations, especially mining stocks, commodities, and natural resources. but i think it is sort of the all-americans, your procter & gambles, your american expresses, so don't forget your financials and your health care stocks. get that waiting back up to where it should be. > all right matt. we have your call on tape. we will play it back at the end of 2013 and see how you did. > > i will see you in 365 days. with no presidential election, no stimulus programs on the horizon and healthcare reform upheld, 2013 should be smooth sailing f
.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news for the spanish economy. >>> now in a long-anticipated speech on the future of britain in the european union, prime minister cameron has warned that democratic consent from a u.k. membership is "wafer thin." speaking in london, he said he's in favor of having e.u. referendum but not at the moment and urged e.u. leaders to address the challenges currently alienating the electorate. >> there's a gap between the e.u. and citizens which has grown dramatically in recent years and which represents a lack of democratic accountability and consent that is, yes, felt particularly acutely here in britain. now if we don't address these challenges, the sdarj that europe will -- danger is that europe will fail and the british people will drift toward the exit. >> i spoke to unilever's paul pohlman to get his thoughts on the strained relationship with the european union and whether a potential u.k. exit is bad for business. >> if you create a certain level of uncertainty between now and 2017 or whatever the date is of a proposed referendum i
to attribute all this do. we'll talk to gouldsby about jumging the economy. i don't know if he's good about -- >> he's been pretty spot on. >> but we're going to hear up some of the party line from him. i saw some of the stuff he says. we're going to find out why we're doing a little better and is whether it's going to continue. let's get the national forecast now. oh, my man is back, the weather channel's reynolds wolf. i told you that the last time. cold weather. >> that's right. >> climate change, snow climate change, no snow, climate change. any variability. and we know about weather over the years, over the millions and billions of years. we know that it never -- the median line is because of all this variability. so it goes like this and then we get to the middle. but now, anything that is not right on that middle average is now seen as, oh, something is happening. >> reynolds is going, what? >> no. he is with me. he knows exactly what i'm saying. every single thing is because of co2 emissions now, reynolds. >> i am just absorbing this. i am just absorbing this. no, we have to talk, m
in 2014. the moves do follow heavy pressure from shinzo abe despite reflation and a flagging economy. but the yen actually settled higher with some economists. look at that. that is suggesting they ended up almost 1.2% above the dollar. there's questions whether the 2% dollar stated can be achieved. now there's plenty more on the boj's inflation packed with the government live. hi. >> hi, kelly. the bank of japan and the government issued a joint statement that set a 2% inflation target today replacing its current 1% price. from japan's monetary policy has shifted into unexplored territory. the boj agreed to try and hit the 2% target as quickly as possible rather than over the medium to long-term. but the target will probably be difficult to meet. forecasts released by the bank showed that the consumer price index will rise to just 0.9% in the fiscal year starting in 2014. boj officials said that the 2% target will be possible if the country's growth potential is improved by further government reform. the joint statement is binding for both the government and the boj calling on both
of an economy. steams you come there and you obviously things don't always always come through. northbound suggested it's because the adjectives are fun. do you buy that? >> no. i would say the last couple of years, people were pretty negative. i have to say, though i've only been here a day, people are pretty positive this time. a bit more optimistic about what might be happening. i wouldn't say it's time to pop champagne, but people have been more positive this year. >> thank you for being here. joe, becky, back to you guys. we'll see new a little bit. we have a fun segment for you at 6:30. >> you do. i looked through some of the stuff, andrew. you're a regular skier. >> it's a little embarrassing, but we'll show it to you. >> don't give it away. >> but your heel -- >> there it is. >> your heel is not tethers to the ski, right? that's what makes it -- right? >> this is a different type of skiing that i had never done before. >> oh, god. good. >> now you've got the piece. you'll see it. there might be a fall or two involved. >> that's how your hair got messed up yesterday. >>> coming, wha
of the ongoing drought is having on the u.s. economy and food prices. plus, your e-mails, phone calls, and tweets. washington journal live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> one of the key themes, of course, for any exhibition on the civil wars are the abolition and e mans nation. we are fortunate that they came of age what they did. between the two of them, they make issues around e mans passion and abolition. issues around human rights and american freedom on a general nonrace specific level. ly go through every piece of include that johnson puts in the picture. i'll summarize by saying for you pay attention to the top half as well as the bottom half. what you get is a white cat in the bedroom window and dark skin black woman holding a child. there's a ladder and a fabric coming out the other. there's a way in and out without being seen. there's a rooster up here. roosters have a habit in the evening of finding a perch and calling to the hen to spend the night with them. the hen is on top of the slave quarters. if you add up of the little ins and outs and look down here at the white girl enteri
's strong point, the economy has also been a big issue. more from our colleague. >> yes. welcome to jerusalem where we will be broadcasting for the next two days. israel's election. driving to the heart of a sensitive but still stagnant process of peacemaking with the palace. today is a day for israelis to make a choice about their next leaders. no political party has ever gained a majority in israeli elections. so there's expected to be a lot of postturing about what type of government there will be for israel over the next four years. my colleague looks at what is on the ballot box today. >> israel's prime minister, benjamin netanyahu was cheery this morning as he arrives to vote. by the end of the day he will likely have something more to be chief about. the leader of the party is expected to come out on top and keep his job. but at jerusalem's main market the lack of suspense means there's little fever. they talk about israel being divided and disillusioned. most take it as a give than benjamin netanyahu will remain in office. >> if you ask me, nothing. no b.b., no nothing. >
they were so-called developed economies. and so what i thought i would do here is just run through some of the lessons that we learned there that i think, unfortunately, shut up and looked at by the europeans. and they are only now starting to realize that they could have cut down the present negative situation because let's face it, europe as a whole, with a few exceptions, is in either a recession or stagnation. first, each country is unique. this is something they didn't want to see. greece adding the situation by longtime mismanagement on the fiscal side and raid the banks. in the case of ireland, it was the banks the drag the sovereign is -- sovereign as. in the case of portugal, with some portuguese in the audience here, it was basically a decade of no growth in portugal. in the case of spain, it was a bubble in real estate that was financed by mainly the savings and loan institutions, some of which have gone under, a number have gone under. and a government that basically drove up the deficit, and regional governments because regions are very important in spain, also drove up thi
in equity. the economy is going to be lousy for the next two years. >> so we're running this online poll which is asking this question, this lack of current crisis that we have, is that because there has been real progress or is it century? >> no. i think it's a product. the ecb has stepped up and merkel and others committed to some day doing the kinds of physical transfers of banking units they need. and there has been some real progress even off that cleanup. but none of that is going to offset the unemployment numbers, barred from that the lack of investment, the constraint on demand from the austerity programs, the feedback in europe. so, again, it is real progress, but that's not going translate to growth anytime soon. >> when you say not going to translate into growth, what is the outlook? >> to me, what i've been saying for a few months is that europe's past is bounded from below and from above. we've ruled out the worst of the crisis, thank god. but the austerity, unemployment and continued downward wage pressures put a tight ceiling on growth. so germany is growing less than 11%
and the germans do it, they do it right. and weak economies, heavily dependent on exports, heavily dependent on the car industry and that could go up and down. two things. i don't think they have the political will to engage outside the borders and i don't think they have the financial resources to do as much as we thought they should do and even some of their policy people think they should do relative to their national security, strength, military strength. is always not in a condition to do that and a heavy reliance on u.s. presence as that diminishes, some tough decisions to make as other nations. >> good morning. barbara matthews, international regulatory analytics. i have a question about the 20% written large. you have described what sounds like what you consider to be an inevitable retrenchment if not potential return to some isolation in the united states weather for political reasons or budgetary constraint purposes. that is a different position than the guarantor of security and liberty globally. europe may not have the financial resources to pick up the baton. can you describe wh
in the u.s., in germany and to an extent in the uk. >> the trouble is for all of those economies maybe some of the european ones are under pressure by the government. but the problem is, if you look at issues in the u.s., they're just so low. there's no ability to cut in the long-term. how do you push through entitlement reform and address those issues, especially if there's no market pressure right now? >> my sense is that you don't. i don't understand how that can be achieved and, therefore, i suppose what i struggle with is what solution can the government find? the bank of japan, if you monetize the debt in a low inflationary environment, is this a free lunch? >> right. >> in the uk, it has turned out to be a free lunch. would it in japan? possibly, yes, and, therefore, i wonder if these issues ever will be addressed. >> and what's so interesting, you're seeing these bizarre rates happening in a monetary policy. we feel like we're in a whole new regime where people feel like it doesn't matter at all. wondering if it matters at all how much you spend and borrow in these situations. how d
. >> and an international audience watching on tv. a lot of europeans want to know which way the world's biggest economy is headed and can politicians sort things out. here is a man that thinks he can make a difference the second time around. obama then looked forward to his next and final four years in office calling an end to the politics of division and saying the united states could achieve anything if it acted as one. >> a decade of war is now ending. an economic recovery has begun. america's possibilities are limitless, for we possess all of the qualities this world without boundaries demand, youth and drive, diversity and openness. an endless capacity for risk and a gift for reinvention. my fellow americans, we are made for this moment and we will seize it so long as we seize it together. >> our washington correspondent was there. you were at the inauguration. obama had quite a big wish list. take us through it. >> well, it is not really a wish list. inaugural speeches are not the place for a wish list. but you can read between the lines. i would sum it up with two words, unity and equality. a me
the economy come up again, and the employment -- unemployment rate is still too high but i think this will improve. we're out of iraq and we are changing our policy in afghanistan, and osama bin laden is dead. the president has made a commitment to education and he is running with a 52% approval rate, and this is a good start for a second term. >> what about the critics of the president to say that the deficit has grown and he has not put his weight behind climate change. in his first address, he mentioned climate change three times. and there are still problems in the country and the criticism -- is that he has given a fabulous speech but has not followed through. >> i think some of the criticism is fair but you have to also talk about his initial priorities or challenges. he is really committed to doing something about this in the second term. the deficit is one of the most difficult issues and the president -- he does not sign the appropriation bills until they are passed by congress. and this is not something that the president can do alone. it is the congress decides how big
community reacted in a very still a way to the threat of but leaving, saying that the german economy would be able to cope with that, though it would of course regret it. even more important, perhaps, the united states reacted very negatively. the relationship between britain and the united states has been the mainstay of british foreign policy for more than a century. yesterday, a member of the state department said that if britain were to leave the european union, that would seriously damage the special relationship between washington and london. >> thank you very much. >> to washington now where u.s. senator john kerry is president obama's choice for the next secretary of state. he has been quizzed by senators ahead of his recommendation. >> the issues like climate change and fighting disease are also priorities. he's expected to easily win approval for the job from the senate. to syria where authorities have called for a million-man prayer at mosques on friday in an effort to stem anti-regime demonstrations. >> the embattled president was also shown on state television praying with syr
to the reconstruction of the south economic he and the revitalization of the content economy, which all of america relied on. the industrialization of many parts of the south. all of these things continued into the 20th century up to the dawn of world war ii. we do not know how many african americans found themselves back in a world of being bought and sold, but there is more evidence about this existing than many historians realize are wanted to confront. hundreds of thousands of people were bought and sold. thousands and thousands of african-american men and some african-american women died under horrifying circumstances. this was a system that relied on fatality and starvation and intimidation and a more fertile kind of involuntary servitude than what preceded it. it became a weapon of terror and intimidation to force african- americans from exercising their civil rights and intimidating them into compliance with the other kinds of explicative liver that we know more about. the repercussions of all of that are still with us. the legacy of that economically and educationally is very much somethi
, of the global economy and also for us in europe, um, is free trade. we have, unfortunately, a lot of protectionist tendencies in the world today. when we met at the g20 meeting outlined this time and again and impressed this on us, and we need to do everything we can in order to contain these protectionist tendencies. the doha round, the world trade organization has not, unfortunately, developed in such a positive direction as we wished. so in the future, too, unfortunately, we need to pin our hopes on financial trade agreements. and germany, i can promise you, will be very proactive as regards the conclusion of such fha agreements. we've now given the mandate for a free trade agreement with japan, with canada. we're shortly before conclusion of an fta with the -- [inaudible] states. we urgently need to come to such agreements. and after decades of failed attempts, we would like to do this with the united states as well, develop such a free trade agreement with the european union. quite often cultural exports are a bit bit of a hurdle here on bh sides, but i think we need to do, w
the lights out. they do favor general motors. i'm saying that the rails as an indicator of the economy, may be failing, because they are so coal-based. but union pacific reports tomorrow that is less coal-based and i think they blow it out. union pacific is a winner. >> interesting point. we'll get a lot more after the break. stick around. we'll see how mcdonald's opens for trading now that we've got their earnings comps. >>> speaking of restaurants, we'll talk to ron shaich about the state of his business and what's new at the chain. [ maleu turn an entrepreneur's dream... ♪ into a scooter that talks to the cloud? ♪ or turn 30-million artifacts... ♪ into a high-tech masterpiece? ♪ whatever your business challenge, dell has the technology and services to help you solve it. whatever your business challenge, i have obligations. cute tobligations, but obligations.g. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares fo
and the germans do that, they do it right. but with some failing economies are weak economies that heavily depend on exports, heavily dependent on the car industry. david notes that can go up and down. and so, two things. i don't think they have the political will to engage much outside the borders. and i don't think they have the financial resources to do is manage as we think they should do and maybe even some policy people think they should do relative to their military strength. if salaries were just not in a position to do that now there's been a heavy reliance on u.s. president says that diminishes the tough decisions to make as are other nations. yes, ma'am, her. >> of learning. barbara mathews of bcm analytical as. i've got a question about the 21st century with large. you have described what sounds like you consider to be as inevitable retrenchment if not a potential return to some isolationists in the united states whether for political reasons or budgetary constraint purposes. that is a very different position than america as a guarantor of security and liberty locally. europe may not
on women in combat. we will take that up with the "a-team" and what it means for our society, economy, and, of course, united states military as we proceed here tonight. stay with us. a bull run on wall street. the market at a 5-year high. the dow jones industrial near record highs. apple is in freefall. is the magic over for the jobless tech giant? north korea perhaps for a nuclear test. names american enemy number one. fox news terrorism expert tells us what the united states should do next. aah! learning how to kick flip 6 stairs takes determination. so will getting into college. i've got what it takes. so do you. ♪ lou: protests in egypt turning deadly as thousands and thousands of egyptians took to the streets to protest their new government and president mohammed more seats. today's clashes marking the to dish your anniversary if -- joined by fox his middle east and terrorism expert and analysts. good to have you here. let's start with what is happening in egypt. give us a sense of -- this has been going on for some time. to what affect? >> well, look, this is a defining moment. wh
looks at china's fast growing economy and asks, is it headed for a crash? >> wages are rising for the burgeoning middle class, but for hardscrabble factory workers: mounting protests against unlivable wages and working conditions. >> ifill: and vice president joe biden hangs out with hari sreenivasan on google plus to talk about gun violence. >> make your voices heard. this town listens when people rise up and speak. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour."
for the eurozone, and in particular, the eurozone crisis countries. the usa, southeast asia, and growth economies are important here. from that point of view, this cannot be taken as a signal that the eurozone crisis is over. while the eurozone crisis may not be over, the head of the european central bank, mario draghi, sees positive signs according to statements he made in davos. >> the level of activity is in the process of stabilizing at very low levels. we foresee a recovery in the second part of the year. >> there will still be some time before the effects of the reforms spread to european businesses as well. >> traders liked the results of the latest business report. dorothy sent us this report from the frankfurt stock exchange. them and good news traders have been waiting for. the market gained momentum. traders now believe in the strong rebound in the first quarter. there were also positive signs from the eurozone banking sector. banks are going to pay back earlier than expected. but the largest german solar group cannot pay back its debt any more and ask donors for a fare cut. share pric
economies -- >> he pointed out that germany, like many other european countries, as failed in its pledge to contribute 0.7% of gross thomistic product to development programs. >> we will be back in one minute. >> welcome back. more trouble for angela merkel 's coalition partners, the free democrats. in addition to lagging in the opinion polls, now they are facing allegations of sexism. >> the parties lead candidate in this autumn's elections, rainer bruderle, is accused of making inappropriate comments to a female journalist. >> the case has triggered a national debate on how sexism persists in german society. >> rainer bruderle is not talking to any journalists at the moment. he has made no comment on the allegations that have triggered a fierce debate in germany about verbal sexual harassment of women. the leading politicians of the party are covering bruderle's back. they say it is all just a slur campaign against their top man. >> i have seen nothing else to support the impression that the ftp -- fdp is in any way less sensitive to the participation of women. >> the party's top femal
the global economy, in large part because one strategist told me it appears japan, or the yen is a reserve currency, the attractiveness there is starting to diminish as people become more optimistic about risk asset. great horizons a great child care company based in watertown, massachusetts. the company was priced at $22 a share. but right now the indication is $25 to $27. 10.1 million shares being very well received by the investment community today. a couple of the stocks we'll be watching today. the earnings parade continues. halliburton opening at a 52-week high after it came in with earnings of 63 cents a share. its international operations helping to offset the weakness in the north american operations. the company also actually said weakness in north america could continue this year -- continue through 2013. but obviously investors like the news on the results. hasbro had a weak fourth quarter. the earnings revenue came in below expectations. the company plans to cut 10% of the work force as a result of the disappointing earnings. there you can see its stock under pressure today. l
into the economy. once again, harry became one of the most visible members of the roosevelt administration and the new deal. he was on the cover of time magazine twice. he hung out with the kennedy family and other notable families of the time. in 1938 and 1939, the president's encouragement -- i have notes on us this -- harry began promoting himself as a presidential candidate. looking to the election in 1940. he leased a farm in iowa, of course. his hopes were dashed when hundreds were reporting a story about a comment that he allegedly made to a friend at the racetrack, which did not put the administration in a good light read the comment attributed to him was we shall tax and spend. whether true or not, of course, he denied it. it stuck with him for the rest of his life and became a rallying cry for those who hated roosevelt and the new deal. as if that wasn't enough, in september of 1939 when war broke out in europe, he found himself back at the mayo clinic. the doctors ruled out a recurrence of cancer, but they could not figure out why he was unable to absorb nutrients. so they gave
, renewable energy, reducing gun violence, and building an economy that last -- get this -- from the middle out. for all these reasons, and many more, it gives me great pleasure to second the nomination of congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz to serve a second term at the helm of the democratic national committee. [applause] >> thank you. the chair now recognizes a member of the dnc spanish cauc caucus, for another session and speech. by the way, i'm not trying to hog the stage. if you want to come up here, feel welcome. >> i am okay. thank you very much. good afternoon, everyone. i am very honored. i come from the great state that gave you the most marvelous president, barack obama. [applause] >> i am also proud to join my fellow democrats nominating congresswoman debbie wasserman schultz for the chair of democratic national committee. while my home is illinois, florida is very close and dear to my heart. my family is smart enough to move out there 20 years ago, so i consider you my congresswoman, too. i've always, i thought of debbie wasserman schultz as my second congressman. it is my
and tell people it is going to save their economy, when actually it devastates local communities. >> hundreds of people gathered in new york city on saturday for a public memorial service honoring and schwartz, the internet freedom activist who took his own life earlier this month. he was weeks before trial date for downloading millions of articles provided by the nonprofit research service jstor at mit. swartz was facing 35 years in prison, a penalty supporters called excessively harsh. at the memorial, aaron swartz's partner, taren stinebrickner- kauffman, called for prosecutors to be held accountable. >> on last friday he face the prospect of yet another three months of uncertainty of ups and downs of being forced by the government to spend every fiber of his being on this damnable, since this trial. with no guarantee could exonerate himself at the end of it. he was so scared and so frustrated and so desperate and more than anything, just so weary. i think he just could not take it another day. aarib would have loved to have been here because of the last week, phoenix's are al
of year. ♪ nice sweater. thank you. ♪ thank you. ♪ (train horn) vo: wherever our trains go, the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. it's lots of things. all waking up. ♪ becoming part of the global phenomenon we call the internet of everything. ♪ trees will talk to networks will talk to scientists about climate change. cars will talk to road sensors will talk to stoplights about traffic efficiency. the ambulance will talk to patient records will talk to doctors about saving lives. it's going to be amazing. and exciting. and maybe, most remarkably, not that far away. the next big thing? we're going to wake the world up. ♪ and watch, with eyes wide, as it gets to work. ♪ cisco. tomorrow starts here. or treat gas with these after you get it. now that's like sunblock before or sun burn cream later. oh, somebody out there's saying, now i get it! take beano before and there'll be no gas. >>> the communist nation plans to carry out a nuclear test and more long-range tests as part of an all-out confrontation with the united states. leon panetta say
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